Friday, November 6, 2009

Revision 911!

Tomorrow, I'm jet-setting to nearby Charlotte for the SCBWI-Carolinas workshop Revision 911, led by the awesomely amazing Cynthea Liu!

Here's the workshop description:
   In this intensive 4-hour workshop, author and writing coach Cynthea Liu shows you how to revise your ailing work into submission-shape! You will learn how to quickly identify issues with voice, setting, plot, and character through real-life examples, and Cynthea will share smart revision techniques to heal manuscripts as painlessly as possible. She'll also point out symptoms most people casually push aside that shouldn't be ignored.

My question for you:
Do you have any questions you'd like me to ask at the workshop? Ask here, and I'll try to ask tomorrow!!

13 comments:

Tricia J. O'Brien said...

That description is so awesome I will be thrilled if you just pass on those tips for symptoms not to ignore and how to heal as painlessly as possible. Once I get through NaNo, it's back to revising another novel, and I have much to do.

Kristi said...

Any and all revision tips would be wonderful to hear. Have a great time at the conference. :)

B.J. Anderson said...

Wow, yeah, that looks like an awesome workshop! I can't think of anything to ask, but I would love to hear your favorite revision tips when you bet back!

Danyelle said...

*wonders if there's room in Beth's purse for a writer that's on the smallish side* :p

Heather Zundel said...

I've got a question for you - in revising, what are the key things that need to happen in the 1 page of a manuscript and the first ten pages? Thanks Beth! You're a gem.

Rhiannon Hart said...

Do post about it afterwards! I'm dying to hear about the bits people push aside, as I'm a bit of a pusher myself. "Oh, that'll be fine, I'll just leave it..." Which is a HUGE mistake I keep making!

Amy Tate said...

Oh goodie! I can't wait to read about what you learn!!!

Kelly H-Y said...

Have a safe trip and a productive workshop ... sounds fantastic!

Shannon Messenger said...

Ooo, if you have time, I'm having problems with scene description. I keep getting the note that I don't have enough of it, but it's hard to work it in without feeling dry. I'd love to know if they have ay tips.

beth said...

Hey everyone!

I know I've been a bad blogger lately, ignoring all of your blogs (and this one sa well!) But I wanted to let you know that I've got your questions ready, and I plan on taking prodigiuos notes!

If anyone has anything else dire to ask, email me (bethrevis at gmail.com) before 5 tomorrow morning--I will be checking my email, but may not get back here before the workshop.

Mim said...

I'd love to hear some great tips. Revisions are difficult. I see improvement every time, but I enjoy writing more. Have fun at the conference.

Christina Farley said...

Have a wonderful time! I'm sooooo jealous. I want to hear all about it!

Cynthea Liu said...

I've got a question for you - in revising, what are the key things that need to happen in the 1 page of a manuscript and the first ten pages?

- 1st page? Hook in the reader. How? A strong first line, a strong voice, hint at what is to come. Take a look at page one of Paris Pan Takes the Dare to see an example of a stylistic way to create a hook. There are many other ways to do this - but look for great examples in books (published recently -like in the last two years) that draw YOU in.

-1st ten pages? Usually, you need to establish the main character, setting, and potential conflict well in those first ten pages. The tone should match the book. Each paragraph in your book should build the story further, leaving the reader wanting to know more ....so keep that in mind - the first ten pages feels like an arbitrary cut-off. There are no hard-fast rules.

Also, the beginning pages are often tied with your last pages as well. So you can always look at your ending, and see how it might inform your beginning. Hope that helps!

Beth, it was a pleasure meeting you!